The Queer Horror of “Chucky”: Episode 2 – “Give Me Something Good To Eat”

Each week Joe Lipsett will highlight a key scene or interaction in Don Mancini’s Chucky series to consider how the show is engaging with and contributing to queer horror. After last week’s premiere tackled concerns about coming out to unsupportive parents, it’s fascinating to see parents back at the center of attention – albeit in […]

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The Queer Horror of “Chucky”: Episode 1, “Death By Misadventure”

Each week Joe Lipsett will highlight a key scene or interaction in Don Mancini’s Chucky series to consider how the show is engaging with and contributing to queer horror. There are plenty of thrilling moments in the premiere of Don Mancini’s Chucky series on Syfy. In addition to homages to both the series’ films and […]

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‘Joy Ride’, Gay Panic and the Real-Life Case of Matthew Shepard [Horror Queers Podcast]

Caaaaandy Caaaaaane. September was all over the map, with episodes on influential slow burn It Follows, A Nightmare on Elm Street‘s wacky “final” entry Freddy’s Dead, David Lynch’s surreal LA satire Mulholland Drive, and classic lesbian vampire film Dracula’s Daughter. Now that we’re into October, it’s time to bring out some big titles, starting with director John Dahl‘s […]

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Learning to Appreciate Getting Lost In David Lynch’s ‘Mulholland Drive’ [Horror Queers Podcast]

Masc Matale The slow inch towards October continues, but in the interim, September has been a bounty of great content on the pod! We’ve been to Germany with Der Samurai, Detroit with It Follows and Springwood last week with Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare. Now we’re headed to Los Angeles to cover our very first […]

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Debating Camp vs Trash in ‘Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare’ [Horror Queers Podcast]

Looney Tunes. After back-to-back weeks of visually sumptuous horror films with Germany’s Der Samurai and Detroit‘s It Follows, Trace and I are tackling a franchise entry with the 30th anniversary of Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare (1991). Joining us is Mark O. Estes, host of the Midnight Social Distortion podcast, who has strong nostalgic feelings for the […]

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[TIFF Review] In ‘Zalava’, a Demonic Possession Leads to Mass Hysteria and Paranoia

Superstition and paranoia abound in Iranian writer-director Arsalan Amiri’s film, Zalava. Set in the titular village in the northwestern mountains of Iran in 1978, the film chronicles one long day and night as the village descends into panic, fear and mass hysteria that a demon is attacking their home. What’s fascinating about the film, which […]

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[TIFF Review] Irish Folklore Film ‘You Are Not My Mother’ Finds The Horror At Home

The term folk horror inspires certain kinds of imagery: pastoral fields, shrouded woods, period pieces, and witchcraft. In North American horror, legends tend to take the form of tall tales (Urban Legend, Candyman, I Know What You Did Last Summer) or whispered myths (Wendigos, Indigenous burial grounds, etc).  In Irish writer/director’s Kate Dolan’s directorial feature […]

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The Dreadful Comfort of Slow Burn Horror and ‘It Follows’ [Horror Queers Podcast]

Bait Bus. We’re deep into September after an August filled with queer dinner parties, bees and flies. After last week’s escape to Germany with Der Samurai, we’re back on US soil and firmly rooted in the suburbs of Detroit with David Robert Mitchell‘s contemporary classic, It Follows. We’re joined by Trace’s hubbie Ari Drew, who helps […]

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[TIFF Review] Netflix’s Korean Drama Series ‘Hellbound’ Has a Great Premise, But Struggles With Its Execution

As far as TV properties go, Hellbound has a pretty awesome hook. The gist of the six-episode live-action Netflix series is as follows: What would happen if angels began appearing, informing individuals that they would die for their sins in a few days, and when the time arrived, those people were beaten to death by […]

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[TIFF Review] Edgar Wright’s ‘Last Night in Soho’ Is a Stylish, but Repetitive Thriller

There’s an infectious energy in the early parts of Edgar Wright’s new film, Last Night in Soho. The film opens with a dance number as aspiring fashion designer Eloise (Thomasin McKenzie) lip-synchs to one of her many records in her grandmother (Rita Tushingham)’s country house and this effusive excitement permeates the screen. Eloise is an […]

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[TIFF Review] Erotic Thriller ‘Inexorable’ Is Stuck at Half-Mast

Inexorable. Adj: meaning impossible to stop or prevent.  That’s not quite an accurate depiction of what occurs in Fabrice Du Welz’s latest film. Sure, once events are put into motion, they’re difficult to stop, but the Belgian filmmaker, known for his share of provocative films, is treading lightly with Inexorable, an erotic thriller that’s sadly […]

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[TIFF Review] ‘Memoria’ Is a Contemplative Meditation on Memory and Experience

There’s a calculated aimlessness to Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Memoria, particularly in the way that the writer/director’s first film English and Spanish doesn’t employ a conventional narrative structure (there’s no rising action or climax, for example). Instead, as its title suggests, Memoria is intent on exploring memories and memorials and, in the process, (re)creating them as experiences […]

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Exploring the True Villain of the Original ‘Candyman’ [Horror Queers Podcast]

Chunky Peanut Butter Poo. Another month come and gone and it’s been a wild one on the pod! We covered our first 40s film with the very queer Rope, chuckled our way through 80s slasher parody Student Bodies and then dug into the AIDS allegory at the heart of The Fly. Now it’s time to put August to […]

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[Fantasia Review] ‘Martyrs Lane’ Offers Ghostly Mystery Through a Child’s Eyes

There’s a mystery afoot in Ruth Platt’s ghost film, Martyrs Lane. The film, a feature adaptation of the writer/director’s 2019 short of the same name, is less interested in traditional spectral hauntings than exploring grief and loss through the eyes of a little girl who doesn’t fully understand what’s going on. While there are still […]

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[Fantasia Review] Supernatural Indigenous Film ‘Don’t Say Its Name’ Is Topical, But Struggles With Its Scares

Rueben Martell’s Don’t Say Its Name opens with a hit and run. Kharis (Sheena Kaine), a young Indigenous woman, is walking on a back road when she’s struck and killed. Her assailant isn’t seen, but her death has immediate ramifications that extend far beyond her grieving mother Mary Lynne (Carla Fox); it winds up affecting […]

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